Category Archives: Uncategorized

Madazolm

For anyone using the rectal Diastat I have found Madazolm to be far better in stopping seizures. You can get it in needle form or nasal form but you have to ask your doctor. The nasal form is just a cushion top that pops on the syringe after you have drawn the liquid meds. I have used Diastat a dozen times and it has not stopped the seizures but the Madazolm works like a champ. I used 1.0 ml or 2.5 mg and the seizure stopped within minutes and my daughter opened her eyes in about 20 minutes. Plus the recovery time is an hour or so with little sickness. With the Diastat she would be sick for days. By the way it is the same drug just administered differently.

RIP prison nun

Sister Antonia Brenner dies at 86; nun moved into Tijuana prison to tend to inmates
Guards and inmates in La Mesa penitentiary referred to Brenner as the prison angel. In the cellblocks she was known as ‘Mama.’

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In this photo from 2002, Sister Antonia Brenner consoles inmate Jorge Villalobos inside her converted cell at the notorious La Mesa penitentiary in Tijuana. Brenner died Thursday at the age of 86. (Don Bartletti / Los Angeles Times / November 15, 2002)

Out of prison and into the unknown

Photos: Notable deaths of 2013

Oscar Hijuelos dies at 62; Pulitzer Prize-winning novelist

Kumar Pallana dies at 94; character actor discovered by Wes Anderson

Sara Fritz dies at 68; former Times journalist

By Richard Marosi
October 17, 2013, 6:51 p.m.
Sister Antonia Brenner, a Beverly Hills-raised mother of seven who became a Roman Catholic nun and moved into a notorious Tijuana prison where she spent more than three decades mending broken lives, easing tensions and dispensing everything from toothbrushes to bail money, has died. She was 86.

Brenner, who had been in declining health, died Thursday of natural causes at the home of her religious order in Tijuana where her fellow sisters had cared for her in her final days, said Christina Brenner, her daughter-in-law.

She was born Mary Clarke in Los Angeles on Dec. 1, 1926, to Irish immigrant parents. Her father grew wealthy running an office supply business, and the family counted Hollywood stars such as Cary Grant among their neighbors. She married and raised four daughters and three sons, all the while becoming deeply involved in charity work.

In 1977, after her children were grown and two marriages had ended in divorce — a source of sadness that she rarely talked about — Brenner gave away her expensive clothes and belongings, left her Ventura apartment and moved to La Mesa penitentiary. She had delivered donations in the past to the prison, each visit filling her with compassion.

“Something happened to me when I saw men behind bars. … When I left, I thought a lot about the men. When it was cold, I wondered if the men were warm; when it was raining, if they had shelter,” Brenner told The Times in a 1982 interview. “I wondered if they had medicine and how their families were doing. …You know, when I returned to the prison to live, I felt as if I’d come home.”

Small of stature, with blue eyes peeking out from under her traditional black–and-white habit, Brenner cut a strikingly serene presence in the overcrowded prison of 8,000. She lived as any other inmate, sleeping in a 10-by-10-foot cell, eating the same food and lining up for morning roll call.

She would walk freely among thieves and drug traffickers and murderers, smiling, touching cheeks and offering prayers. Many were violent men with desperate needs. She kept extra toilet paper in her cell, arranged for medical treatment, attended funerals.

Guards and inmates alike started referring to her as the prison angel. In the cellblocks she was known simply as “Mama.” “There isn’t anyone who hasn’t heard my lecture on victims,” she said in a 2002 Times story. “They have to accept that they’re wrong. They have to see the consequences. They have to feel the agony. … But I do love them dearly.”

When prayers didn’t work, she took matters into her own hands. On more than a few occasions she broke up fights and quelled brewing riots. Sometimes her presence wasn’t enough. In 2008, police opened fire on rioting inmates, killing more than 20. Brenner said she was in the cellblock at the time, but someone had locked the doors to the courtyard where the shooting occurred.

“I didn’t know what was happening. That people were being killed,” she said in an interview after the siege ended. “I was thinking, all over the world little children have to hear the sounds of guns. It’s such a terrible sound.”

Brenner was an energetic fundraiser who often visited Southern California to collect food and supplies. Few people said no, though sometimes she didn’t leave them much choice.

Father Joe Carroll, who for many years ran the St. Vincent de Paul Village in San Diego, jokingly took to calling Brenner a “thief” for regularly clearing out his charity of donations.

“If I told her she couldn’t have it, she’d just be smiling and giggling at me and putting it into her car and leaving,” Carroll said in the 2010 documentary “La Mama: An American Nun’s Life in a Mexican Prison.”

A revered figure in Tijuana, where she counted police chiefs and politicians among her friends, Brenner was honored with the naming of a street after her outside the prison. In the late 1990s, she established her own religious order, the Eudist Servants of the Eleventh Hour. Tijuana Archbishop Rafael Romo said she possessed the qualities of a saint and said her death was a “terrible loss” for the city, the Tijuana newspaper Frontera reported.

Brenner often visited her family in Southern California, where she would regale her more than 45 grandchildren and great-grandchildren with stories about her charity work. “She was a tiny woman with a little fire and a lot of passion,” Christina Brenner said. “We called her the Eveready battery. She wouldn’t stop. She was always going.”

She is also survived by her seven children, James, Kathleen, Theresa, Carol, Tom, Elizabeth and Anthony.

“You walk in her presence and you know you’re in a different world,” Carroll said. “Rhyme, reason — you can’t rationalize why she did it. She has that one-on-one relationship with God.”

richard.marosi@latimes.com

MIDAZOLAM

Midazolam[1] (/mɪˈdæzəlæm/, marketed in English-speaking countries and Mexico under the trade names Dormicum,[2] Hypnovel,[3] and Versed,[4]) is a short-acting drug in the benzodiazepine class developed by Hoffmann-La Roche in the 1970s.[5] The drug is used for treatment of acute seizures, moderate to severe insomnia, and for inducing sedation and amnesia before medical procedures. It possesses profoundly potent anxiolytic, amnestic, hypnotic, anticonvulsant, skeletal muscle relaxant, and sedative properties.[6][7][8] Midazolam has a fast recovery time and is the most commonly used benzodiazepine as a premedication for sedation; less commonly it is used for induction and maintenance of anesthesia. Flumazenil, a benzodiazepine antagonist drug, can be used to treat an overdose of midazolam, as well as to reverse sedation.[7] However, flumazenil can trigger seizures in mixed overdoses and in benzodiazepine-dependent individuals, so is not used in most cases.[9][10]
Administration of midazolam by the intranasal or the buccal route (absorption via the gums and cheek) as an alternative to rectally administered diazepam is becoming increasingly popular for the emergency treatment of seizures in children.[11] Midazolam is also used for endoscopy[12] procedural sedation and sedation in intensive care.[13][14] The anterograde amnesia property of midazolam is useful for premedication before surgery to inhibit unpleasant memories.[15] Midazolam, like many other benzodiazepines, has a rapid onset of action, high effectiveness and low toxicity level. Drawbacks of midazolam include drug interactions, tolerance, and withdrawal syndrome, as well as adverse events including cognitive impairment and sedation.[15] Paradoxical effects occasionally occur, most commonly in children and the elderly,[15] particularly after intravenous administration.[16]

epilepsy

When Halloween is coming and your child can’t eat candy because he follows a special diet to treat his epilepsy, you don’t just tell him he can’t trick or treat. You don’t even just tell the neighbors he can’t have candy. No — you go to the toy store, get some alternate giveaways and distribute them to people nearby with one helluva great note.

It may seem like you are a superhero, and to your child, you probably are. People may share your words on Reddit — not once, but several times — and you’ll go viral because love like this is too beautiful not to share.

Some people may even call you the “best dad EVER,” but as anyone with kids knows, this is what parenting is all about.

 

laughing epilepsy

Arizona Man Cured of Lifelong Crying Seizures, 350 a Month
Oct. 8, 2013
By SUSAN DONALDSON JAMES
SUSAN DONALDSON JAMES More From Susan »
Digital Reporter

SUSAN DONALDSON JAMES More From Susan »

Digital Reporter

via GOOD MORNING AMERICA

Chris Murto and parents Maura, a school volunteer, and Bill Murto, one of the co-founders of Compaq and now retired. Courtesy Maura Murto

Chris Murto’s silent seizures started when he was a baby, and his doctors thought he was just having night terrors.

“He rarely slept more than two hours at a time,” mom Maura Murto, 59, of Sedona, Ariz., said. “He would wake up and look startled, then begin to cry.”

By the time he was in kindergarten, he would get tense and stiffen up and look terrified, but it always happened when he was asleep.

“His face would grimace and a slight tear would roll down his cheek,” she said.

Doctors diagnosed a rare type of benign tumor — a hypothalamic hamartoma (HH) — that would eventually cause up to 350 seizures a month by the time he was 13, and put him on medication, sometimes 25 pills a day.

WHAT TO KNOW
Hypothalamic hamartomas are an abnormal collection of cells in the brain.
The tumor acts like a pacemaker that fires abnormal signals that cause a seizure.
In gelastic seizures, a child can explode with crying or laughter.
Only one in 200,000 are affected by this rare condition.
But today, at 29, Murto is seizure-free, thanks to Barrow Neurological Institute at St. Joseph’s Hospital and Medical Center in Phoenix, the first in the country to treat HH tumors. The surgeons used new, minimally invasive laser-surgery techniques to burn out the tumor in his brain.

These gelastic seizures involved a sudden burst of energy, usually in the form of laughing or crying and can be uncomfortable. They can damage the brain and lead to progressive cognitive impairment.

“When someone said seizures, I thought grand mal with someone on the floor,” his mother said. “Innocently, I didn’t know what we were dealing with.”

Beginning when he was 5, Chris’ parents logged his daily seizures on a chart, but they began to worsen as he grew older, disrupting his thought process and ability to learn. His IQ even dropped to 79 from 120 and his parents were told he would never live independently.

“He had tremors in his hand, his eyes rolled up in his head so you could see the whites, he slept a lot and his drool was out of control,” Maura Murto said. “He was losing ground mentally and physically.”

Chris Murto had thousands of seizures every year by the time he was 13.

“It’s impossible to explain the amount of pain I was experiencing,” said Chris, who’s father, Bill, co-founded the the Compaq Computer Corp.

“A small child can explode with laughter even when you look in their eyes and can tell they are not happy; it’s quite creepy.” — Neurosurgeon Dr. Peter Nakaji
Chris’ latest seizure chart has had all zeroes since he had surgery in August 2012.

Courtesy Maura Murto
Since having MRI-guided laser surgery, Chris Murto has had all zeroes on his seizure chart..
“Oh, my gosh, what a miracle for our family,” his mother said. “It was absolutely amazing. Now we have all zeroes on his chart.”

HH tumors are an abnormal collection of cells that sit at the base of the brain near the hypothalamus, affecting only about 1 in 200,000 individuals — only about 100 cases at any one time, according his neurosurgeon, Dr. Peter Nakaji.

“The cells are like a little pacemaker that fires abnormal signals and cause a rare kind of gelastic seizure,” he said. “A small child can explode with laughter even when you look in their eyes and can tell they are not happy; it’s quite creepy.

“They are basically like a computer that keeps resetting,” he said. “You can imagine how disruptive that is and what their life is like.”

Murto describes the seizures that lasted about 15 or 20 seconds each: “Did you ever have a dream where you feel like you are supposed to be somewhere and you wake up? You still feel kind of out of place, but it’s not the right place.

“I feel displaced for a little bit and I have a pulsing feeling in my left ear.”

In 1997, Maura Murto gave her then 13-year-old son a bucket of marbles so he could count his own nightly seizures. He placed one in a bag by his bed each time he had one.

“He had over 1,000 a month. The bag was overflowing with marbles everywhere,” she said. “I asked if he’d spilled the bag and he said, ‘No I lost count.'”

 

crying seizures

Chris Murto’s silent seizures started when he was a baby, and his doctors thought he was just having night terrors.

“He rarely slept more than two hours at a time,” mom Maura Murto, 59, of Sedona, Ariz., said. “He would wake up and look startled, then begin to cry.”

By the time he was in kindergarten, he would get tense and stiffen up and look terrified, but it always happened when he was asleep.

“His face would grimace and a slight tear would roll down his cheek,” she said.

Doctors diagnosed a rare type of benign tumor — a hypothalamic hamartoma (HH) — that would eventually cause up to 350 seizures a month by the time he was 13, and put him on medication, sometimes 25 pills a day.

WHAT TO KNOW
Hypothalamic hamartomas are an abnormal collection of cells in the brain.
The tumor acts like a pacemaker that fires abnormal signals that cause a seizure.
In gelastic seizures, a child can explode with crying or laughter.
Only one in 200,000 are affected by this rare condition.
But today, at 29, Murto is seizure-free, thanks to Barrow Neurological Institute at St. Joseph’s Hospital and Medical Center in Phoenix, the first in the country to treat HH tumors. The surgeons used new, minimally invasive laser-surgery techniques to burn out the tumor in his brain.

These gelastic seizures involved a sudden burst of energy, usually in the form of laughing or crying and can be uncomfortable. They can damage the brain and lead to progressive cognitive impairment.

“When someone said seizures, I thought grand mal with someone on the floor,” his mother said. “Innocently, I didn’t know what we were dealing with.”

Beginning when he was 5, Chris’ parents logged his daily seizures on a chart, but they began to worsen as he grew older, disrupting his thought process and ability to learn. His IQ even dropped to 79 from 120 and his parents were told he would never live independently.

“He had tremors in his hand, his eyes rolled up in his head so you could see the whites, he slept a lot and his drool was out of control,” Maura Murto said. “He was losing ground mentally and physically.”

Chris Murto had thousands of seizures every year by the time he was 13.

“It’s impossible to explain the amount of pain I was experiencing,” said Chris, who’s father, Bill, co-founded the the Compaq Computer Corp.

“A small child can explode with laughter even when you look in their eyes and can tell they are not happy; it’s quite creepy.” — Neurosurgeon Dr. Peter Nakaji
Chris’ latest seizure chart has had all zeroes since he had surgery in August 2012.

Courtesy Maura Murto
Since having MRI-guided laser surgery, Chris Murto has had all zeroes on his seizure chart..
“Oh, my gosh, what a miracle for our family,” his mother said. “It was absolutely amazing. Now we have all zeroes on his chart.”

HH tumors are an abnormal collection of cells that sit at the base of the brain near the hypothalamus, affecting only about 1 in 200,000 individuals — only about 100 cases at any one time, according his neurosurgeon, Dr. Peter Nakaji.

“The cells are like a little pacemaker that fires abnormal signals and cause a rare kind of gelastic seizure,” he said. “A small child can explode with laughter even when you look in their eyes and can tell they are not happy; it’s quite creepy.

“They are basically like a computer that keeps resetting,” he said. “You can imagine how disruptive that is and what their life is like.”

Murto describes the seizures that lasted about 15 or 20 seconds each: “Did you ever have a dream where you feel like you are supposed to be somewhere and you wake up? You still feel kind of out of place, but it’s not the right place.

“I feel displaced for a little bit and I have a pulsing feeling in my left ear.”

In 1997, Maura Murto gave her then 13-year-old son a bucket of marbles so he could count his own nightly seizures. He placed one in a bag by his bed each time he had one.

“He had over 1,000 a month. The bag was overflowing with marbles everywhere,” she said. “I asked if he’d spilled the bag and he said, ‘No I lost count.'”